passport

This hashtag in English

Last updated 20w.

A passport is a travel document, usually issued by a country's government to its citizens, that certifies the identity and nationality of its holder primarily for the purpose of international travel. Standard passports may contain information such as the holder's name, place and date of birth, photograph, signature, and other relevant identifying information.

Many countries issue (or plan to issue) biometric passports that contain an embedded microchip, making them machine-readable and difficult to counterfeit. As of January 2019, there were over 150 jurisdictions issuing e-passports. Previously issued non-biometric machine-readable passports usually remain valid until their respective expiration dates.

A passport holder is normally entitled to enter the country that issued the passport, though some people entitled to a passport may not be full citizens with right of abode (e.g. American nationals or British nationals). A passport does not of itself create any rights in the country being visited or obligate the issuing country in any way, such as providing consular assistance. Some passports attest to the bearer having a status as a diplomat or other official, entitled to rights and privileges such as immunity from arrest or prosecution.

Many countries normally allow entry to holders of passports of other countries, sometimes requiring a visa also to be obtained, but this is not an automatic right. Many other additional conditions may apply, such as not being likely to become a public charge for financial or other reasons, and the holder not having been convicted of a crime. Where a country does not recognise another, or is in dispute with it, it may prohibit the use of their passport for travel to that other country, or may prohibit entry to holders of that other country's passports, and sometimes to others who have, for example, visited the other country. Some individuals are subject to sanctions which deny them entry into particular countries.

Some countries and international organisations issue travel documents which are not standard passports, but enable the holder to travel internationally to countries that recognise the documents. For example, stateless persons are not normally issued a national passport, but may be able to obtain a refugee travel document or the earlier "Nansen passport" which enables them to travel to countries which recognise the document, and sometimes to return to the issuing country.

Passports may be requested in other circumstances to confirm identification such as checking into a hotel or when changing money to a local currency. Passports and other travel documents have an expiry date, after which it is no longer recognised, but it is recommended that a passport is valid for at least six months as many airlines deny boarding to passengers whose passport has a shorter expiry date, even if the destination country may not have such a requirement.

One of the earliest known references to paperwork that served in a role similar to that of a passport is found in the Hebrew Bible. Nehemiah 2:7–9, dating from approximately 450 BC, states that Nehemiah, an official serving King Artaxerxes I of Persia, asked permission to travel to Judea; the king granted leave and gave him a letter "to the governors beyond the river" requesting safe passage for him as he traveled through their lands.

Arthashastra (c.  3rd century BCE) make mentions of passes issued at the rate of one masha per pass to enter and exit the country. Chapter 34 of the Second Book of Arthashastra concerns with the duties of the Mudrādhyakṣa (lit.'Superintendent of Seals') who must issue sealed passes before a person could enter or leave the countryside.

Passports were an important part of the Chinese bureaucracy as early as the Western Han (202 BCE-220 CE), if not in the Qin Dynasty. They required such details as age, height, and bodily features. These passports (zhuan) determined a person's ability to move throughout imperial counties and through points of control. Even children needed passports, but those of one year or less who were in their mother's care may not have needed them.

In the medieval Islamic Caliphate, a form of passport was the bara'a, a receipt for taxes paid. Only people who paid their zakah (for Muslims) or jizya (for dhimmis) taxes were permitted to travel to different regions of the Caliphate; thus, the bara'a receipt was a "basic passport."

Etymological sources show that the term "passport" is from a medieval document that was required in order to pass through the gate (or "porte") of a city wall or to pass through a territory. In medieval Europe, such documents were issued to foreign travellers by local authorities (as opposed to local citizens, as is the modern practice) and generally contained a list of towns and cities the document holder was permitted to enter or pass through. On the whole, documents were not required for travel to sea ports, which were considered open trading points, but documents were required to travel inland from sea ports.

King Henry V of England is credited with having invented what some consider the first passport in the modern sense, as a means of helping his subjects prove who they were in foreign lands. The earliest reference to these documents is found in a 1414 Act of Parliament. In 1540, granting travel documents in England became a role of the Privy Council of England, and it was around this time that the term "passport" was used. In 1794, issuing British passports became the job of the Office of the Secretary of State. The 1548 Imperial Diet of Augsburg required the public to hold imperial documents for travel, at the risk of permanent exile.

A rapid expansion of railway infrastructure and wealth in Europe beginning in the mid-nineteenth century led to large increases in the volume of international travel and a consequent unique dilution of the passport system for approximately thirty years prior to World War I. The speed of trains, as well as the number of passengers that crossed multiple borders, made enforcement of passport laws difficult. The general reaction was the relaxation of passport requirements. In the later part of the nineteenth century and up to World War I, passports were not required, on the whole, for travel within Europe, and crossing a border was a relatively straightforward procedure. Consequently, comparatively few people held passports.

During World War I, European governments introduced border passport requirements for security reasons, and to control the emigration of people with useful skills. These controls remained in place after the war, becoming a standard, though controversial, procedure. British tourists of the 1920s complained, especially about attached photographs and physical descriptions, which they considered led to a "nasty dehumanisation". The British Nationality and Status of Aliens Act was passed in 1914, clearly defining the notions of citizenship and creating a booklet form of the passport.

In 1920, the League of Nations held a conference on passports, the Paris Conference on Passports & Customs Formalities and Through Tickets. Passport guidelines and a general booklet design resulted from the conference, which was followed up by conferences in 1926 and 1927.

While the United Nations held a travel conference in 1963, no passport guidelines resulted from it. Passport standardization came about in 1980, under the auspices of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). ICAO standards include those for machine-readable passports. Such passports have an area where some of the information otherwise written in textual form is written as strings of alphanumeric characters, printed in a manner suitable for optical character recognition. This enables border controllers and other law enforcement agents to process these passports more quickly, without having to input the information manually into a computer. ICAO publishes Doc 9303 Machine Readable Travel Documents, the technical standard for machine-readable passports. A more recent standard is for biometric passports. These contain biometrics to authenticate the identity of travellers. The passport's critical information is stored on a tiny RFID computer chip, much like information stored on smartcards. Like some smartcards, the passport booklet design calls for an embedded contactless chip that is able to hold digital signature data to ensure the integrity of the passport and the biometric data.

Historically, legal authority to issue passports is founded on the exercise of each country's executive discretion (or Crown prerogative). Certain legal tenets follow, namely: first, passports are issued in the name of the state; second, no person has a legal right to be issued a passport; third, each country's government, in exercising its executive discretion, has complete and unfettered discretion to refuse to issue or to revoke a passport; and fourth, that the latter discretion is not subject to judicial review. However, legal scholars including A.J. Arkelian have argued that evolutions in both the constitutional law of democratic countries and the international law applicable to all countries now render those historical tenets both obsolete and unlawful.

Under some circumstances some countries allow people to hold more than one passport document. This may apply, for example, to people who travel a lot on business, and may need to have, say, a passport to travel on while another is awaiting a visa for another country. The UK for example may issue a second passport if the applicant can show a need and supporting documentation, such as a letter from an employer.

Today, most countries issue individual passports to applying citizens, including children, with only a few still issuing family passports (see below under "Types") or including children on a parent's passport (most countries having switched to individual passports in the early to mid-20th century). When passport holders apply for a new passport (commonly, due to expiration of the previous passport, insufficient validity for entry to some countries or lack of blank pages), they may be required to surrender the old passport for invalidation. In some circumstances an expired passport is not required to be surrendered or invalidated (for example, if it contains an unexpired visa).

Under the law of most countries, passports are government property, and may be limited or revoked at any time, usually on specified grounds, and possibly subject to judicial review. In many countries, surrender of one's passport is a condition of granting bail in lieu of imprisonment for a pending criminal trial due to flight risk.

Each country sets its own conditions for the issue of passports. For example, Pakistan requires applicants to be interviewed before a Pakistani passport will be granted. When applying for a passport or a national ID card, all Pakistanis are required to sign an oath declaring Mirza Ghulam Ahmad to be an impostor prophet and all Ahmadis to be non-Muslims.

Some countries limit the issuance of passports, where incoming and outgoing international travels are highly regulated, such as North Korea, where ordinary passports are the privilege of a very small number of people trusted by the government.[citation needed] Other countries put requirements on some citizens in order to be granted passports, such as Finland, where male citizens aged 18–30 years must prove that they have completed, or are exempt from, their obligatory military service to be granted an unrestricted passport; otherwise a passport is issued valid only until the end of their 28th year, to ensure that they return to carry out military service. Other countries with obligatory military service, such as South Korea and Syria, have similar requirements, e.g. South Korean passport and Syrian passport.

Passports contain a statement of the nationality of the holder. In most countries, only one class of nationality exists, and only one type of ordinary passport is issued. However, several types of exceptions exist:

The United Kingdom has a number of classes of United Kingdom nationality due to its colonial history. As a result, the UK issues various passports which are similar in appearance but representative of different nationality statuses which, in turn, has caused foreign governments to subject holders of different UK passports to different entry requirements.

The People's Republic of China (PRC) authorizes its Special Administrative Regions of Hong Kong and Macau to issue passports to their permanent residents with Chinese nationality under the "one country, two systems" arrangement. Visa policies imposed by foreign authorities on Hong Kong and Macau permanent residents holding such passports are different from those holding ordinary passports of the People's Republic of China. A Hong Kong Special Administrative Region passport (HKSAR passport) permits visa-free access to many more countries than ordinary PRC passports.

The three constituent countries of the Danish Realm have a common nationality. Denmark proper is a member of the European Union, but Greenland and Faroe Islands are not. Danish citizens residing in Greenland or Faroe Islands can choose between holding a Danish EU passport and a Greenlandic or Faroese non-EU Danish passport.

In rare instances a nationality is available through investment. Some investors have been described in Tongan passports as 'a Tongan protected person', a status which does not necessarily carry with it the right of abode in Tonga.

Several entities without a sovereign territory issue documents described as passports, most notably Iroquois League, the Aboriginal Provisional Government in Australia and the Sovereign Military Order of Malta. Such documents are not necessarily accepted for entry into a country.

Passports have a limited validity, usually between 5 and 10 years.

Many countries require passports to be valid for a minimum of six months beyond the planned date of departure, as well as having at least two to four blank pages. It is recommended that a passport be valid for at least six months from the departure date as many airlines deny boarding to passengers whose passport has a shorter expiry date, even if the destination country does not have such a requirement for incoming visitors.

One method to measure the 'value' of a passport is to calculate its 'visa-free score' (VFS), which is the number of countries that allow the holder of that passport entry for general tourism without requiring a visa. As of 1 July 2019, the strongest and weakest passports are as follows:

A rough standardization exists in types of passports throughout the world, although passport types, number of pages, and definitions can vary by country.

Non-citizens in Latvia and Estonia are individuals, primarily of Russian or Ukrainian ethnicity, who are not citizens of Latvia or Estonia but whose families have resided in the area since the Soviet era, and thus have the right to a non-citizen passport issued by the Latvian government as well as other specific rights. Approximately two thirds of them are ethnic Russians, followed by ethnic Belarusians, ethnic Ukrainians, ethnic Poles and ethnic Lithuanians.

Non-citizens in the two countries are issued special non-citizen passports as opposed to regular passports issued by the Estonian and Latvian authorities to citizens.

Although all U.S. citizens are also U.S. nationals, the reverse is not true. As specified in 8 U.S.C. § 1408, a person whose only connection to the U.S. is through birth in an outlying possession (which is defined in 8 U.S.C. § 1101 as American Samoa and Swains Island, the latter of which is administered as part of American Samoa), or through descent from a person so born, acquires U.S. nationality but not U.S. citizenship. This was formerly the case in a few other current or former U.S. overseas possessions, i.e. the Panama Canal Zone and Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands.

The U.S. passport issued to non-citizen nationals contains the endorsement code 9 which states: "THE BEARER IS A UNITED STATES NATIONAL AND NOT A UNITED STATES CITIZEN." on the annotations page.

Non-citizen U.S. nationals may reside and work in the United States without restrictions, and may apply for citizenship under the same rules as resident aliens. Like resident aliens, they are not presently allowed by any U.S. state to vote in federal or state elections, although, as with resident aliens, there is no constitutional prohibition against their doing so.

Due to the complexity of British nationality law, the United Kingdom has six variants of British nationality. Out of these variants, however, only the status known as British citizen grants the right of abode in a particular country or territory (the United Kingdom) while others do not. Hence, the UK issues British passports to those who are British nationals but not British citizens, which include British Overseas Territories citizens, British Overseas citizens, British subjects, British Nationals (Overseas) and British Protected Persons.

Children born in Andorra to foreign residents who have not yet resided in the country for a minimum of 10 years are provided a provisional passport. Once the child reaches 18 years old he or she must confirm their nationality to the Government.

For some countries, passports are required for some types of travel between their sovereign territories. Three examples of this are:

Internal passports are issued by some countries as an identity document. An example is the internal passport of Russia or certain other post-Soviet countries dating back to imperial times. Some countries use internal passports for controlling migration within a country. In some countries, the international passport or passport for travel abroad is a second passport, in addition to the internal passport, required for a citizen to travel abroad within the country of residence. Separate passports for travel abroad existed or exist in the following countries:

The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) issues passport standards which are treated as recommendations to national governments. The size of passport booklets normally complies with the ISO/IEC 7810 ID-3 standard, which specifies a size of 125 × 88 mm (4.921 × 3.465 in). This size is the B7 format. Passport cards are issued to the ID-1 (credit card sized) standard.

Passport booklets from almost all countries around the world display the national coat of arms of the issuing country on the front cover. The United Nations keeps a record of national coats of arms, but displaying a coat of arms is not an internationally recognized requirement for a passport.

There are several groups of countries that have, by mutual agreement, adopted common designs for their passports:

Passports sometimes contain a message, usually near the front, requesting that the passport's bearer be allowed to pass freely, and further requesting that, in the event of need, the bearer be granted assistance. The message is sometimes made in the name of the government or the head of state, and may be written in more than one language, depending on the language policies of the issuing authority.

In 1920, an international conference on passports and through tickets held by the League of Nations recommended that passports be issued in the French language, historically the language of diplomacy, and one other language. Currently, the ICAO recommends that passports be issued in English and French, or in the national language of the issuing country and in either English or French. Many European countries use their national language, along with English and French.

Some unusual language combinations are:

For immigration control, officials of many countries use entry and exit stamps. Depending on the country, a stamp can serve different purposes. For example, in the United Kingdom, an immigration stamp in a passport includes the formal leave to enter granted to a person subject to entry control. In other countries, a stamp activates or acknowledges the continuing leave conferred in the passport bearer's entry clearance.

Under the Schengen system, a foreign passport is stamped with a date stamp which does not indicate any duration of stay. This means that the person is deemed to have permission to remain either for three months or for the period shown on his visa if specified otherwise.

Visas often take the form of an inked stamp, although some countries use adhesive stickers that incorporate security features to discourage forgery.

Member states of the European Union are not permitted to place a stamp in the passport of a person who is not subject to immigration control. Stamping is prohibited because it is an imposition of a control that the person is not subject to.

Countries usually have different styles of stamps for entries and exits, to make it easier to identify the movements of people. Ink colour might be used to designate mode of transportation (air, land or sea), such as in Hong Kong prior to 1997; while border styles did the same thing in Macau. Other variations include changing the size of the stamp to indicate length of stay, as in Singapore.

Immigration stamps are a useful reminder of travels. Some travellers "collect" immigration stamps in passports, and will choose to enter or exit countries via different means (for example, land, sea or air) in order to have different stamps in their passports. Some countries, such as Liechtenstein, that do not stamp passports may provide a passport stamp on request for such "memory" purposes. Monaco (at its tourist office) and Andorra (at its border) do this as well. These are official stamps issued by government offices. However, some private enterprises may for a price stamp passports at historic sites and these have no legal standing. It is possible that such memorial stamps can preclude the passport bearer from travelling to certain countries. For example, Finland consistently rejects what they call 'falsified passports', where passport bearers have been refused visas or entry due to memorial stamps and are required to renew their passports.

A passport is merely an identity document that is widely recognised for international travel purposes, and the possession of a passport does not in itself entitle a traveller to enter any country other than the country that issued it, and sometimes not even then. Many countries normally require visitors to obtain a visa. Each country has different requirements or conditions for the grant of visas, such as for the visitor not being likely to become a public charge for financial, health, family, or other reasons, and the holder not having been convicted of a crime or considered likely to commit one.

Where a country does not recognise another, or is in dispute with it, entry may be prohibited to holders of passports of the other party to the dispute, and sometimes to others who have, for example, visited the other country; examples are listed below. A country that issues a passport may also restrict its validity or use in specified circumstances, such as use for travel to certain countries for political, security, or health reasons.

International travel is possible without passports in some circumstances. Nonetheless, a document stating citizenship, such as a national identity card or an Enhanced Drivers License, is usually required.

Mercosur citizens can travel visa-free and only with their ID cards between the member and associated countries (Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Chile, Paraguay, Uruguay, Brazil and Argentina).

2 Open border with Schengen Area.

3 Partially recognized.

1 British Overseas Territories. 2 Open border with Schengen Area. 3 Russia is included as a European country here because the majority of its population (80%) lives in European Russia. 4 These countries span the conventional boundary between Europe and Asia. 5  Part of the Realm of New Zealand. 6  Partially recognized. 7 Unincorporated territory of the United States. 8 Part of Norway, not part of the Schengen Area, special open-border status under Svalbard Treaty. 9 Part of the Kingdom of Denmark, not part of the Schengen Area. 10 Egypt spans the boundary between North Africa and the Middle East.

1 British Overseas Territories. 2 Part of the Schengen Area. 3 Open border with Schengen Area. 4 Azerbaijan, Georgia, Turkey, Kazakhstan and the partially recognised republics of Abkhazia and South Ossetia each span the conventional boundary between Europe and Asia. 5 Cyprus, Armenia, and the partially recognised republics of Artsakh and Northern Cyprus are entirely in Southwest Asia but have socio-political connections with Europe. 6 Egypt spans the boundary between North Africa and the Middle East. 7 Partially recognized. 8 Part of the Kingdom of Denmark, not part of the Schengen Area. 9 Russia has territory in both Eastern Europe and Northern Asia. The vast majority of its population (80%) lives in European Russia. 10 Part of the Nordic Passport Union.

#UttarakhandPolice will not clear verification for passport or arms license for people who post anti-national conte…
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Respected @akshaykumar ji , in an interview around more than a year ago, you said that you were going to give up yo…
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Uttarakhand BJP govt plans to penalise dissent by linking social media posts with passport verification. Bihar NDA…
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@SiobhanBenita Some people would chop their right arm off for a British passport, you ungrateful snob. Hand it back if you hate it.
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@SiobhanBenita Can you not get an Irish passport
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RT @AishaSalaudeen: I was judged harshly by immigration staff when I went to renew my international passport for keeping my name. Refusing…
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RT @lolagirl2007: @thedailybeast @brianklaas once charged pending trial aren't you suppose to surrender your passport........
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Get used to it. A UK passport is for life, not just for Christmas. But if you want to give it up early, please feel…
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Read to learn how British Airways is making travel as straightforward as possible for customers and restoring trave…
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RT @DailyMirror: EXCLUSIVE Passengers waiting hours at Heathrow 'jump over' passport barrier amid 'mutiny'
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@NenjiLivhuwani ari ṱoḓeli @BlackLwendo passport a ṱuwe mzansi🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣
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this should be standard cover for the Latvian passport tbh
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@SiobhanBenita Well move to another country if you hate this one so much. You dont deserve that passport when so m…
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RT @FinancialTimes: Denmark is to launch a coronavirus passport by the end of this month to help business travel, while Sweden will demand…
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RT @mariamembreno__: @Uriel99xx i have my passport ready wym
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this passport shit really getting annoying. opening up unnecessary shit like speed up the process open up important offices !!!
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I’m so getting my passport this year . No if ands or buts about it
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RT @AishaSalaudeen: I was judged harshly by immigration staff when I went to renew my international passport for keeping my name. Refusing…
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RT @newscientist: Covid-19 news: • Vaccine against new variants could be ready by autumn, says Oxford researcher • Denmark announces plan t…
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#Childmarriage survivor Elizabeth: At 16, I was forced to marry a 28yo man after a 3-day engagement. No questions f…
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Further Clarification: This to clarify that the Uttarkhand Police is enforcing the provision which is already ther…
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A new term has entered the vocabulary among governments and in the travel industry: vaccine passport. In the near f…
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@HM_Passport Hi Chris, I have already DM @HM_Passport this morning with all the details. appreciate your help.
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RT @Access2JusticeF: Take a look at our #ProBono passport - a guide for #litigantsinperson and advice agencies to monitor and record time s…
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@RahulGandhi China kya hai jo jaruri hai wo hai delhi Delhi koyi or desh ban gya he kya in chamcho ki wajah se ab…
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RT @ILQLive: Open your New ‘CB Instant Account’ on your Mobile in less than 5 minutes. Download CBQ Mobile!👉 Fill i…
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RT @grapetie_: cerita tentang hw4ng hyvnj!n yang nekat pergi ke negara kangguru hanya untuk menonton konser sendirian. hanya bermodal passp…
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RT @Quicktake: 🇭🇰 “I knew from a long time ago the political situation would gradually worsen.” 🇬🇧 300,000+ Hong Kong locals are expected…
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logo ki buri halat hogi jb sarkar bdlegi.... Tb inka passport koi aur bnayega Fir unki chatenge... #SaluteToDGPAshokKumar
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RT @Ashokkumarips: Further Clarification: This to clarify that the Uttarkhand Police is enforcing the provision which is already there in…
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RT @amaanbali: Here is what Dissent looks like in india. 1. If you protest in Bihar, you will not be given clearance by police for passpor…
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RT @htTweets: Denmark said that it would launch a first version of a #coronavirus vaccination passport by the end of February.
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RT @Ashokkumarips: Further Clarification: This to clarify that the Uttarkhand Police is enforcing the provision which is already there in…
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RT @Ashokkumarips: Further Clarification: This to clarify that the Uttarkhand Police is enforcing the provision which is already there in…
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@passport_cutty Sometimes. And sometimes ppl may deal with unbearable offenses bc of the situation surrounding the…
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RT @EPC_UKplc: Renew your MPQC SPA Safety Passport with our comprehensive webinar on the 9 February. Our experienced team will provide you…
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RT @euromaestro: Vaccination passport coming to Denmark The document potentially affords special travel privileges, also could allow visi…
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( 카톡: oticket ) passport 구글정보이용료 debt 핸드폰소액결제 forehead 신용카드현금화 smell 신용카드깡 over 휴대폰정보이용료 rail 카드한도현금화 mechanism 휴대폰소액결제 정책 365일 24시 언제나 친절상담
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@SiobhanBenita Just use your other passport then, problem solved.
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Nigeria’s new Visa Policy allows Nigerians living abroad (who do not have a valid Nigerian passport) to visit home…
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RT @FowlerProf: Do you support the idea of a "health passport" i.e the denial of certain liberties in the absence of proof of a vaccination…
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RT @bayiepresident: Chris Travels book us now ( study abroad, ticket reservation, passport, visa process, Nusing permanent posting, Nss ,…
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We've got an exciting announcement to make! Our Ghana Passport Biometric Enrolment Centre in Los Angeles is now ope…
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RT @tanjit_sandhu: @SahibSi82990197 @amaanbali @amaanbali Yes, Bihar no Gov jobs. And Uttrakhand no passport clearance. And Delhi : this 👇…
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RT @FowlerProf: Do you support the idea of a "health passport" i.e the denial of certain liberties in the absence of proof of a vaccination…
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RT @DoubleEph: This is the most Nigerian thing I’ve ever seen. No way this guy doesn’t have a green passport
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RT @politico: What if an app could take you back to normal life — or at least take you into a restaurant? It’s not a time machine. Tech com…
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RT @Baesomee: dm me if your passport is blue or red & you want to marry.
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ลองคิดเงินเล่นๆ Passport 1000 TOEIC 1800 IELTS 7xxx SAT 3xxx SAT Subject 2xxx ยังไม่รวมค่าเดินทาง เอกสาร ถ้าคะแนนไ…
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RT @lokinhei: my unlawful assembly case: pleaded NOT guilty today. Hearing scheduled to Sept 2022! 😓😓😓 my passport was taken by the court…
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@PickardJE Why are various media outlets today reporting that "Government plans Covid vaccine passports to allow fo…
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@NickyWoolf Arriving to Cape Town from Ireland early February last year and seeing a line of workers in masks doing…
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RT @KashmirTraitors: #Asiya Andrabi is a #Kashmiri Separatist and leader of Dukhtaran-e-Millat. She has been criticized for inciting the Ka…
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RT @MetroUK: No vaccine passport? No holiday ✋
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@Shivani03352514 passport size photo😂
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Was obvious from the off. Just lately been inundated with holiday emails and several brochures thru the door.
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RT @euro_myths: A-Z of Euromyths 1992 to 2018 - #FakeNews from fake press - - European passport will replace nation…
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Sarah Rapson, chief executive of the Identity and Passport Service, unveils the new UK passport today, which features extra security features and pictures of British landmarks
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There are few travel situations more nightmarish than realizing a passport is expired right before a trip.
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May 21, 2021 02:17
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🎁Newly Launched Combo Of Wallet +Eyewear Case + Keychain 🎁💞Colours Available : 💚Black💚Brown💚Tan💚Navy Blue⭐ Material : Leather📣Next Day Dispatch 📣(5-6 days In Delivery)📣Charms and Color Options Available 📣...🌸DM for price and details...For More Offers Follow 👉 @wallet__love ..._______#wallets #namegift #giftideas #shadescover #customizekeychain #gifttohusband #couplegoals #sunglasses #customizedwallet #namewallet #namewallets #anniversarygift #customizedwallets #leatherlove #passport #namepassportcover #keychain #leather #leatherworks #leathercrafts #customizedpassportcover #customkeychains #passportcover #nameclutch #wallet #kolkata #instagood #mumbai #tamilnadu #kerala
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#keychain #passportcover #leatherlove #leathercrafts #wallet
May 21, 2021 02:17
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𝐒𝐭𝐮𝐝𝐲 𝐢𝐧 𝐂𝐚𝐧𝐚𝐝𝐚Get ready to make futuristic life more mesmerising by settling down in Canada. Choose from the various courses offered by the Top Notch Universities and Colleges of Canada🇨🇦 and live your dreams in real only with Globeway Immigrations.Contact us at +1 431 337 9375Reach us on www.gwimmigrations.comEmail us atstudy@gwimmigrations.com#immigration #studyvisa #studentvisa #Canada #studyinCanada #Abroad #studyinforeign #abroadstudies #studyinabroad #passport #intakes2021
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#immigration #studyinforeign #canada #studentvisa #studyincanada
May 21, 2021 02:17
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..PASSPORT🛹🐨..かなりカッコいいです🤤どのグラフィックも良い感じですね🤤..密かに、ファンが増え続けてるPASSPORT🇦🇺..女の子にも気に入ってもらえると思うのでスケート女子も見に来てくれたら嬉しいです🥰..色々と入荷してますので雨で行くところも限られてくると思うので暇つぶしにでも来てください🙋🏻‍♂️.#passport #HOME #homewakayama #clothingstore #street #skateboard #fashion #和歌山 #和歌山市 #ぶらくり #ぶらくり丁
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#homewakayama #clothingstore #passport #fashion #home
May 21, 2021 02:17
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Galicia mola 💚........#galicia #galiciacalidade #galicia_enamora #travel #travelphotography #travelgram #travelblogger #traveltheworld #travellover #traveladdict #nature #naturephotography #naturelovers #nature_perfection #natureshots #instagood #instagram #instamood #instamoment #passport #ontheroad #seaside #sea #sealovers #sealife #picoftheday #photooftheday #ocean #oceanlover #spain
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#instagram #instamood #ocean #spain #oceanlover
May 21, 2021 02:17
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#covers#passport#marbleffect#colours#dmfrmoreinfo
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#dmfrmoreinfo #covers #marbleffect #passport #colours
May 21, 2021 02:17
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#visas #visa #immigration #visaservices #usa #greencard #travel #visaconsultants #visaamericana #n #miami #business #passport #workpermit #immigrationlaw #indonesia #eb #indonesiavisa #ecuador #visaapplication #indonesiavisaservices #migration #asilopolitico #visaservice #abogados #australia #visaextension #florida #a
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#visa #passport #visaextension #business #greencard