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#withbutterfliesandwarriors

Posts tagged as #withbutterfliesandwarriors on Instagram

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Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - a member of Kenya Wildlife Services removes the  ivory from an elephant killed by poachers, from ‘with butterflies and warriors’ on show @xposurexpf Sharjah, UAE. Enormously appreciative of the opportunity to present this work to such an audience, it’s vital that we do so if we are to effect change. @natgeo #conservation #northernkenya #kenya #withbutterfliesandwarriors #elephants
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - with butterflies and warriors, the importance of engaging local communities in conservation, northern Kenya @xposurexpf Sharjah UAE until the 22.09.19 #withbutterfliesandwarriors #kenya #northernkenya #sharjah @natgeo
Delighted to be showing ‘with butterflies and warriors’ @xposurexpf in Sharjah, UAE. Vital to get this message out globally. Sharjah presents an extraordinary platform from which we can do exactly that. I’ll be doing a seminar here about this work, and big cat conservation with @stevewinterphoto @kfmoran. Please come along if you’re in the area 😉thanks to all here for the amazing opportunity to engage with the people of the UAE. . . Across Africa, growing populations and deepening poverty have intensified the battle between man and animals for the same land and environmental resources. Increasingly, animals are pushed into smaller pockets of wilderness, their migration routes closed off and their water supplies dammed and diverted elsewhere for other purposes such as crop irrigation. Illegal hunting and poaching has decimated their numbers. At the same time, rural farmers have learned to mistrust wildlife, killing those animals which they see as invading their land. If wildlife conservation is to succeed at all, it is imperative to find a way for man and animal to coexist in harmony, sustainably. Its also crucially important that any income generated from the wildlife is shared with the communities who may face financial hardship as result of the destruction of crops by elephant, death of livestock by leopard and lion, and family members killed or maimed by all three. Communities must be given the options for incentives to conserve, rather than poach. We are, after all, asking pastoralist communities who have not historically benefited from the wildlife that they live alongside, to live in harmony with it, rather than eradicate it in favour of livestock because this is what supports their survival - not the wildlife. #withbutterfliesandwarriors @natgeo @xposurexpf @artfuldodgersimaging @bwyanoleary @filmsnotdead #conservation #africa #kenya #sharjah
Posted @withrepost • @lewishamilton #repost @karmagawa ・・・ ⚠WARNING GRAPHIC IMAGES⚠ Repost from @chancellordavid Vietnam is one of the world’s largest consumers of rhino horn, contributing to the continued poaching of rhinos in the wild. Last year in Africa 1,100 rhinos were killed by poachers. In 2015, the Government of Vietnam increased sanctions on the illegal trade and use of rhino horns. And, through a variety of campaigns, conservation organisations have tried to educate Vietnamese consumers about Africa’s rhino poaching crisis and the uselessness of rhino horn in medications treating various ailments including hangovers, fever, gout and potentially terminal illnesses, like cancer or stroke. Some people also gave it to terminally ill relatives to console them and show that they had done everything in their power to help them. In a recent study it was found that consumers preferred wild rhino horn over farmed rhino horn, and that they weren’t affected by stigma or concerns about rhino populations. The killing of rhinos in Africa was seen as a remote issue, something that happened far away, out of their influence because they didn’t kill the rhinos themselves. If we are to succeed at all its vital that we strive to promote behaviour change via grassroots education. We need to be clear that the demand for rhino horn is not only costing the lives of rhino, but also the lives of those who dedicate their lives to protecting them. A dead father is also extinct to his family and equally a result of their demand for rhino horn - a ranger hurries from the scene of a poaching with a freshly severed horn, at dawn a poacher lies dead his hand resting on his G3 rifle, rangers remove the horn from a poached rhino, blood drips from a police vehicle carrying bodies to the morgue - all from work in northern Kenya - #withbutterfliesandwarriors @natgeo @thephotosociety @everydayextinction #conservation #endextinction
Vídeo de David Chancellor @chancellordavid - “No norte do Quênia, um membro do povo samburu se prepara para a passagem à vida adulta. Para isso, ele usa as contas azuis que definem seu status, além de penas de abutre e, ao final do colar, capas de asas de besouros – representando sua metamorfose de garoto para moran (guerreiro). Além disso, o ritual simboliza a fuga da casa onde ele passou a vida inteira.” - “Sua família agora terá outro moran no clã. Pelos próximos 13 anos, o guerreiro viverá ao lado de seus pares no mato. Uma vez iniciadas, as contas passam para sua mãe, que as usará como lembrança do filho, que agora saiu do ninho. Hoje, as penas de peles de leões e abutres são originárias do Serviços de Vida Selvagem do Quênia, que as distribui aos samburu a partir da mortalidade natural de animais – sem a necessidade de abatê-los”. - #repost @natgeo #withbutterfliesandwarriors #northernkenya #conservation #natgeobrasil #natgeoyourshot #earthfocus #earthpgotography #yourshotphotography #yourshotphotographer #pic #picture #pictureoftheday #instagood #photooftheday #photo #photography #fotobrasil #foto #fotografia
Gathering at sundown with the Moran(warriors) of the Samburu. Despite the powerful forces of modernity, the Samburu take pride in their culture and keeping their rich traditions alive. The tribe is strongly rooted in its culture, norms beliefs and values. They have a strong oral tradition, passing down their history and customs through stories and riddles. . #moraniconservancy #withbutterfliesandwarriors #sunset #culturalsafari #sundown #safaricuisine #lifeinthewilderness #rewildyourlife #magical #touristattraction #tribes #magicalkenya #africa #goldensunset #nikond750 #travelphotography  #darlingescapes #culture #exploreafrica #explore #whyilovekenya  #africasafari #natgeo #facesofkenya #northernkenya #natgeotravel #lifeinthenorthernfrontier #samburu #laikipia #visiterlafrique
#repost from @natgeo  Video and photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | In northern Kenya an initiate from the Samburu people prepares for his passage into manhood. He wears the blue beads defining his status, along with vulture quills and on the very end of the necklace, wing covers from beetles—all signifying his metamorphosis from boy to moran (warrior) and the flight from the home where he’s spent his entire life up to this point. His family now will be other moran from his clan. For the next 13 years, he'll live alongside them in the bush. Once initiated, the beads will pass to his mother, who will wear them and remember her child, now fledged the nest. Today lion skins and vultures quills are sourced from Kenya Wildlife Services, which distributes them to the Samburu from natural animal mortalities, thus negating the necessity to kill wildlife. To see more follow me @chancellordavid #withbutterfliesandwarriors #northernkenya #conservation
🤬🤬 #repost @lewishamilton • • • • • • #repost @karmagawa ・・・ ⚠WARNING GRAPHIC IMAGES⚠ Repost from @chancellordavid Vietnam is one of the world’s largest consumers of rhino horn, contributing to the continued poaching of rhinos in the wild. Last year in Africa 1,100 rhinos were killed by poachers. In 2015, the Government of Vietnam increased sanctions on the illegal trade and use of rhino horns. And, through a variety of campaigns, conservation organisations have tried to educate Vietnamese consumers about Africa’s rhino poaching crisis and the uselessness of rhino horn in medications treating various ailments including hangovers, fever, gout and potentially terminal illnesses, like cancer or stroke. Some people also gave it to terminally ill relatives to console them and show that they had done everything in their power to help them. In a recent study it was found that consumers preferred wild rhino horn over farmed rhino horn, and that they weren’t affected by stigma or concerns about rhino populations. The killing of rhinos in Africa was seen as a remote issue, something that happened far away, out of their influence because they didn’t kill the rhinos themselves. If we are to succeed at all its vital that we strive to promote behaviour change via grassroots education. We need to be clear that the demand for rhino horn is not only costing the lives of rhino, but also the lives of those who dedicate their lives to protecting them. A dead father is also extinct to his family and equally a result of their demand for rhino horn - a ranger hurries from the scene of a poaching with a freshly severed horn, at dawn a poacher lies dead his hand resting on his G3 rifle, rangers remove the horn from a poached rhino, blood drips from a police vehicle carrying bodies to the morgue - all from work in northern Kenya - #withbutterfliesandwarriors @natgeo @thephotosociety @everydayextinction #conservation #endextinction
#repost @lewishamilton @karmagawa ・・・ ⚠WARNING GRAPHIC IMAGES⚠ Repost from @chancellordavid Vietnam is one of the world’s largest consumers of rhino horn, contributing to the continued poaching of rhinos in the wild. Last year in Africa 1,100 rhinos were killed by poachers. In 2015, the Government of Vietnam increased sanctions on the illegal trade and use of rhino horns. And, through a variety of campaigns, conservation organisations have tried to educate Vietnamese consumers about Africa’s rhino poaching crisis and the uselessness of rhino horn in medications treating various ailments including hangovers, fever, gout and potentially terminal illnesses, like cancer or stroke. Some people also gave it to terminally ill relatives to console them and show that they had done everything in their power to help them. In a recent study it was found that consumers preferred wild rhino horn over farmed rhino horn, and that they weren’t affected by stigma or concerns about rhino populations. The killing of rhinos in Africa was seen as a remote issue, something that happened far away, out of their influence because they didn’t kill the rhinos themselves. If we are to succeed at all its vital that we strive to promote behaviour change via grassroots education. We need to be clear that the demand for rhino horn is not only costing the lives of rhino, but also the lives of those who dedicate their lives to protecting them. A dead father is also extinct to his family and equally a result of their demand for rhino horn - a ranger hurries from the scene of a poaching with a freshly severed horn, at dawn a poacher lies dead his hand resting on his G3 rifle, rangers remove the horn from a poached rhino, blood drips from a police vehicle carrying bodies to the morgue - all from work in northern Kenya - #withbutterfliesandwarriors @natgeo @thephotosociety @everydayextinction #conservation #endextinction
Stop that Shit 😟 Reposted from @lewishamilton -  #repost @karmagawa ・・・ ⚠WARNING GRAPHIC IMAGES⚠ Repost from @chancellordavid Vietnam is one of the world’s largest consumers of rhino horn, contributing to the continued poaching of rhinos in the wild. Last year in Africa 1,100 rhinos were killed by poachers. In 2015, the Government of Vietnam increased sanctions on the illegal trade and use of rhino horns. And, through a variety of campaigns, conservation organisations have tried to educate Vietnamese consumers about Africa’s rhino poaching crisis and the uselessness of rhino horn in medications treating various ailments including hangovers, fever, gout and potentially terminal illnesses, like cancer or stroke. Some people also gave it to terminally ill relatives to console them and show that they had done everything in their power to help them. In a recent study it was found that consumers preferred wild rhino horn over farmed rhino horn, and that they weren’t affected by stigma or concerns about rhino populations. The killing of rhinos in Africa was seen as a remote issue, something that happened far away, out of their influence because they didn’t kill the rhinos themselves. If we are to succeed at all its vital that we strive to promote behaviour change via grassroots education. We need to be clear that the demand for rhino horn is not only costing the lives of rhino, but also the lives of those who dedicate their lives to protecting them. A dead father is also extinct to his family and equally a result of their demand for rhino horn - a ranger hurries from the scene of a poaching with a freshly severed horn, at dawn a poacher lies dead his hand resting on his G3 rifle, rangers remove the horn from a poached rhino, blood drips from a police vehicle carrying bodies to the morgue - all from work in northern Kenya - #withbutterfliesandwarriors @natgeo @thephotosociety @everydayextinction #conservation #endextinction - #regrann
#repost @lewishamilton with @get_repost ・・・ #repost @karmagawa ・・・ ⚠WARNING GRAPHIC IMAGES⚠ Repost from @chancellordavid Vietnam is one of the world’s largest consumers of rhino horn, contributing to the continued poaching of rhinos in the wild. Last year in Africa 1,100 rhinos were killed by poachers. In 2015, the Government of Vietnam increased sanctions on the illegal trade and use of rhino horns. And, through a variety of campaigns, conservation organisations have tried to educate Vietnamese consumers about Africa’s rhino poaching crisis and the uselessness of rhino horn in medications treating various ailments including hangovers, fever, gout and potentially terminal illnesses, like cancer or stroke. Some people also gave it to terminally ill relatives to console them and show that they had done everything in their power to help them. In a recent study it was found that consumers preferred wild rhino horn over farmed rhino horn, and that they weren’t affected by stigma or concerns about rhino populations. The killing of rhinos in Africa was seen as a remote issue, something that happened far away, out of their influence because they didn’t kill the rhinos themselves. If we are to succeed at all its vital that we strive to promote behaviour change via grassroots education. We need to be clear that the demand for rhino horn is not only costing the lives of rhino, but also the lives of those who dedicate their lives to protecting them. A dead father is also extinct to his family and equally a result of their demand for rhino horn - a ranger hurries from the scene of a poaching with a freshly severed horn, at dawn a poacher lies dead his hand resting on his G3 rifle, rangers remove the horn from a poached rhino, blood drips from a police vehicle carrying bodies to the morgue - all from work in northern Kenya - #withbutterfliesandwarriors @natgeo @thephotosociety @everydayextinction #conservation #endextinction
#ivsaver(@get_ivsaver) #repost @karmagawa ・・・ ⚠WARNING GRAPHIC IMAGES⚠ Repost from @chancellordavid Vietnam is one of the world’s largest consumers of rhino horn, contributing to the continued poaching of rhinos in the wild. Last year in Africa 1,100 rhinos were killed by poachers. In 2015, the Government of Vietnam increased sanctions on the illegal trade and use of rhino horns. And, through a variety of campaigns, conservation organisations have tried to educate Vietnamese consumers about Africa’s rhino poaching crisis and the uselessness of rhino horn in medications treating various ailments including hangovers, fever, gout and potentially terminal illnesses, like cancer or stroke. Some people also gave it to terminally ill relatives to console them and show that they had done everything in their power to help them. In a recent study it was found that consumers preferred wild rhino horn over farmed rhino horn, and that they weren’t affected by stigma or concerns about rhino populations. The killing of rhinos in Africa was seen as a remote issue, something that happened far away, out of their influence because they didn’t kill the rhinos themselves. If we are to succeed at all its vital that we strive to promote behaviour change via grassroots education. We need to be clear that the demand for rhino horn is not only costing the lives of rhino, but also the lives of those who dedicate their lives to protecting them. A dead father is also extinct to his family and equally a result of their demand for rhino horn - a ranger hurries from the scene of a poaching with a freshly severed horn, at dawn a poacher lies dead his hand resting on his G3 rifle, rangers remove the horn from a poached rhino, blood drips from a police vehicle carrying bodies to the morgue - all from work in northern Kenya - #withbutterfliesandwarriors @natgeo @thephotosociety @everydayextinction #conservation #endextinction
@lewishamilton #repost @karmagawa ・・・ ⚠WARNING GRAPHIC IMAGES⚠ Repost from @chancellordavid Vietnam is one of the world’s largest consumers of rhino horn, contributing to the continued poaching of rhinos in the wild. Last year in Africa 1,100 rhinos were killed by poachers. In 2015, the Government of Vietnam increased sanctions on the illegal trade and use of rhino horns. And, through a variety of campaigns, conservation organisations have tried to educate Vietnamese consumers about Africa’s rhino poaching crisis and the uselessness of rhino horn in medications treating various ailments including hangovers, fever, gout and potentially terminal illnesses, like cancer or stroke. Some people also gave it to terminally ill relatives to console them and show that they had done everything in their power to help them. In a recent study it was found that consumers preferred wild rhino horn over farmed rhino horn, and that they weren’t affected by stigma or concerns about rhino populations. The killing of rhinos in Africa was seen as a remote issue, something that happened far away, out of their influence because they didn’t kill the rhinos themselves. If we are to succeed at all its vital that we strive to promote behaviour change via grassroots education. We need to be clear that the demand for rhino horn is not only costing the lives of rhino, but also the lives of those who dedicate their lives to protecting them. A dead father is also extinct to his family and equally a result of their demand for rhino horn - a ranger hurries from the scene of a poaching with a freshly severed horn, at dawn a poacher lies dead his hand resting on his G3 rifle, rangers remove the horn from a poached rhino, blood drips from a police vehicle carrying bodies to the morgue - all from work in northern Kenya - #withbutterfliesandwarriors @natgeo @thephotosociety @everydayextinction #conservation #endextinction
#repost @lewishamilton (@get_repost) ・・・ #repost @karmagawa ・・・ ⚠WARNING GRAPHIC IMAGES⚠ Repost from @chancellordavid Vietnam is one of the world’s largest consumers of rhino horn, contributing to the continued poaching of rhinos in the wild. Last year in Africa 1,100 rhinos were killed by poachers. In 2015, the Government of Vietnam increased sanctions on the illegal trade and use of rhino horns. And, through a variety of campaigns, conservation organisations have tried to educate Vietnamese consumers about Africa’s rhino poaching crisis and the uselessness of rhino horn in medications treating various ailments including hangovers, fever, gout and potentially terminal illnesses, like cancer or stroke. Some people also gave it to terminally ill relatives to console them and show that they had done everything in their power to help them. In a recent study it was found that consumers preferred wild rhino horn over farmed rhino horn, and that they weren’t affected by stigma or concerns about rhino populations. The killing of rhinos in Africa was seen as a remote issue, something that happened far away, out of their influence because they didn’t kill the rhinos themselves. If we are to succeed at all its vital that we strive to promote behaviour change via grassroots education. We need to be clear that the demand for rhino horn is not only costing the lives of rhino, but also the lives of those who dedicate their lives to protecting them. A dead father is also extinct to his family and equally a result of their demand for rhino horn - a ranger hurries from the scene of a poaching with a freshly severed horn, at dawn a poacher lies dead his hand resting on his G3 rifle, rangers remove the horn from a poached rhino, blood drips from a police vehicle carrying bodies to the morgue - all from work in northern Kenya - #withbutterfliesandwarriors @natgeo @thephotosociety @everydayextinction #conservation #endextinction
Video and photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | In northern Kenya an initiate from the Samburu people prepares for his passage into manhood. He wears the blue beads defining his status, along with vulture quills and on the very end of the necklace, wing covers from beetles—all signifying his metamorphosis from boy to moran (warrior) and the flight from the home where he’s spent his entire life up to this point. His family now will be other moran from his clan. For the next 13 years, he'll live alongside them in the bush. Once initiated, the beads will pass to his mother, who will wear them and remember her child, now fledged the nest. Today lion skins and vultures quills are sourced from Kenya Wildlife Services, which distributes them to the Samburu from natural animal mortalities, thus negating the necessity to kill wildlife. To see more follow me @chancellordavid #withbutterfliesandwarriors #northernkenya #conservation
#repost @lewishamilton with @get_repost ・・・ #repost @karmagawa ・・・ ⚠WARNING GRAPHIC IMAGES⚠ Repost from @chancellordavid Vietnam is one of the world’s largest consumers of rhino horn, contributing to the continued poaching of rhinos in the wild. Last year in Africa 1,100 rhinos were killed by poachers. In 2015, the Government of Vietnam increased sanctions on the illegal trade and use of rhino horns. And, through a variety of campaigns, conservation organisations have tried to educate Vietnamese consumers about Africa’s rhino poaching crisis and the uselessness of rhino horn in medications treating various ailments including hangovers, fever, gout and potentially terminal illnesses, like cancer or stroke. Some people also gave it to terminally ill relatives to console them and show that they had done everything in their power to help them. In a recent study it was found that consumers preferred wild rhino horn over farmed rhino horn, and that they weren’t affected by stigma or concerns about rhino populations. The killing of rhinos in Africa was seen as a remote issue, something that happened far away, out of their influence because they didn’t kill the rhinos themselves. If we are to succeed at all its vital that we strive to promote behaviour change via grassroots education. We need to be clear that the demand for rhino horn is not only costing the lives of rhino, but also the lives of those who dedicate their lives to protecting them. A dead father is also extinct to his family and equally a result of their demand for rhino horn - a ranger hurries from the scene of a poaching with a freshly severed horn, at dawn a poacher lies dead his hand resting on his G3 rifle, rangers remove the horn from a poached rhino, blood drips from a police vehicle carrying bodies to the morgue - all from work in northern Kenya - #withbutterfliesandwarriors @natgeo @thephotosociety @everydayextinction #conservation #endextinction
#repost @karmagawa ・・・ ⚠WARNING GRAPHIC IMAGES⚠ Repost from @chancellordavid Vietnam is one of the world’s largest consumers of rhino horn, contributing to the continued poaching of rhinos in the wild. Last year in Africa 1,100 rhinos were killed by poachers. In 2015, the Government of Vietnam increased sanctions on the illegal trade and use of rhino horns. And, through a variety of campaigns, conservation organisations have tried to educate Vietnamese consumers about Africa’s rhino poaching crisis and the uselessness of rhino horn in medications treating various ailments including hangovers, fever, gout and potentially terminal illnesses, like cancer or stroke. Some people also gave it to terminally ill relatives to console them and show that they had done everything in their power to help them. In a recent study it was found that consumers preferred wild rhino horn over farmed rhino horn, and that they weren’t affected by stigma or concerns about rhino populations. The killing of rhinos in Africa was seen as a remote issue, something that happened far away, out of their influence because they didn’t kill the rhinos themselves. If we are to succeed at all its vital that we strive to promote behaviour change via grassroots education. We need to be clear that the demand for rhino horn is not only costing the lives of rhino, but also the lives of those who dedicate their lives to protecting them. A dead father is also extinct to his family and equally a result of their demand for rhino horn - a ranger hurries from the scene of a poaching with a freshly severed horn, at dawn a poacher lies dead his hand resting on his G3 rifle, rangers remove the horn from a poached rhino, blood drips from a police vehicle carrying bodies to the morgue - all from work in northern Kenya - #withbutterfliesandwarriors @natgeo @thephotosociety @everydayextinction #conservation #endextinction
Video by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - volume ⬆️ for this - Samburu Moran (warriors) northern Kenya passing on knowledge, culture, tradition and hopefully stewardship of the regions wildlife to the new generation of initiates. I understand so much more now 👍🏼👍🏿🖤thanks to all those who let me see more 🖤living #withbutterfliesandwarriors #conservation #northernkenya
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - the mother of a Samburu initiate wears the crown of birds hunted by her son as he progresses into manhood along with the necklace of beads and beetle wings given to him prior to circumcision. The boy will now join the rest of his warrior clan at his Lmuget, where, under the guidance of the elders, each will slaughter a cow and the clan will join together and feast. Once this is complete, he will return to his home for the last time; his clothes will be burned, his body covered entirely in red ochre and he will be wrapped in a white sheet and given new shoes. From this day forth he will be considered a junior Moran (warrior) and adopt the clothes and traditional beaded jewellery of a warrior. His next meal will be from the slaughter of a goat when once more the clan will join together as one. From this point forward he must fend for himself. This is living #withbutterfliesandwarriors #kenya #northernkenya #conservation
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - dawn, northern Kenya - a while ago now I was asked by a Samburu Moran (warrior) to hold the back of his young brother during his initiation. I had no idea at the time what this meant, or the significance of it to us both, but I did know it was an incredible honour. I met him this week and we talked briefly before he returned to his friends and football. I made him shoes out of cow hide and fitted them to his feet; he would wear only these for the month of his metamorphosis into a warrior. I struggled to sleep in my tent not quite knowing what to expect, listening to the songs of warriors and initiates from the surrounding villages. At 02.00 I left the tent and in darkness arrived at his hut which was already surrounded by elders singing songs of courage and support, songs that will help him be strong and carry him into manhood. I’d been told what to expect and what I was required to do, but now when for once I was part of the story, and not an observer, it felt oh so very different. I was to hold his back as the nurse circumcised him. He stood on a cow skin at the door of the home that he’d been brought up in. He was blessed and milk poured on to his shaven head causing him to sit abruptly on the skin. I sat behind him, my legs on either side of his body, I placed my left hand over is forehead and eyes and held his head very tightly to my chest. My right hand I held tightly across his chest, my hand on his heart. He couldn’t see the nurse now sitting in front of him, or the elders surrounding us, but he could hear them, and I could see and hear them both. As the nurse skilfully worked his heart exploded under my hand, and then calmed to a steady beat. We lifted him back into his home and quietly left. He had not made a sound, he was a warrior. I returned as the sun came up, and throughout the day to check on him. I hadn’t expected this, hadn’t expected to see, and more extraordinary feel the birth of a
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - a Samburu initiate carries the birds he’s hunted with bow and arrow, around a crown on his head, northern Kenya. Once an initiate has passed through circumcision on his journey to manhood, he will take up the sticks collected earlier and make a bow and arrow. The arrows are tipped with gum collected some weeks earlier at the very beginning of his journey. For the next weeks he will hunt specific small birds; if successful, he will skin them and place the skins around a crown on his head. The more birds on his crown, the greater his hunting skills. However, certain birds are considered extremely bad luck and killing them inauspicious. Birds also appear extremely sensitive to the smell of the gum placed on the arrows which are designed to make the process more difficult, and therefore the task more challenging. All this is designed to get him moving as quickly as possible after the process of circumcision. The birds signify his flight from his home and journey into the warrior clan. When he passes into the next stage of his metamorphosis, he will give the crown of birds to his mother to remember him by. She will wear them around her neck along with his necklace of blue beads, and beetle wings given prior to circumcision. This is living #withbutterfliesandwarriors #northernkenya #conservation
Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | A Samburu bride leaves her mother's house to move to her husband's village, in northern Kenya. Tradition dictates that during the journey she must not look back. A Samburu legend tells of a young bride who was about to leave her family’s house. Her father gave precise instructions, including not to look back, but the girl was so sad she could not resist a last glance at the home where she had grown up. During the night, the god Nkai, furious with the disobedient girl, decided to punish her. Her body began to swell until it broke through the hut roof, finally turning into a majestic elephant. The Samburu believe that all elephants descend from this girl, and that elephants and the Samburu have blood ties. It's believed that if elephants find a dead man, they place bundles of grass or branches on his grave, and similarly if a Samburu finds a dead elephant, he takes a bundle of green grass, spits on it, and rolls it inside the skull cavity. It's considered a sign of respect and a blessing: the grass is a symbol of peace, and the spit equates to rain, a divine gift in this arid region. It’s traditions like this that we must take time to learn and understand their significance. It’s vital that as we engage with communities, we understand their beliefs.  #withbutterfliesandwarriors #northernkenya #kenya #usuanthropology  Thanks to @natgeo and @chancellordavid for posting!
📸 @chancellordavid ・・・ Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - dawn, northern Kenya - a while ago now I was asked by a Samburu Moran (warrior) to hold the back of his young brother during his initiation. I had no idea at the time what this meant, or the significance of it to us both, but I did know it was an incredible honour. I met him this week and we talked briefly before he returned to his friends and football. I made him shoes out of cow hide and fitted them to his feet; he would wear only these for the month of his metamorphosis into a warrior. I struggled to sleep in my tent not quite knowing what to expect, listening to the songs of warriors and initiates from the surrounding villages. At 02.00 I left the tent and in darkness arrived at his hut which was already surrounded by elders singing songs of courage and support, songs that will help him be strong and carry him into manhood. I’d been told what to expect and what I was required to do, but now when for once I was part of the story, and not an observer, it felt oh so very different. I was to hold his back as the nurse circumcised him. He stood on a cow skin at the door of the home that he’d been brought up in. He was blessed and milk poured on to his shaven head causing him to sit abruptly on the skin. I sat behind him, my legs on either side of his body, I placed my left hand over is forehead and eyes and held his head very tightly to my chest. My right hand I held tightly across his chest, my hand on his heart. He couldn’t see the nurse now sitting in front of him, or the elders surrounding us, but he could hear them, and I could see and hear them both. As the nurse skilfully worked his heart exploded under my hand, and then calmed to a steady beat. We lifted him back into his home and quietly left. He had not made a sound, he was a warrior. I returned as the sun came up, and throughout the day to check on him. I hadn’t expected this, hadn’t expected to see, and more
Off to a wedding, northern Kenya #withbutterfliesandwarriors to see more follow @7incitytv  #kenya #wedding #love  by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | SOUND ON ! . . #friday #love #picoftheday #instagram #mood #happy #fitness #instadaily #fridaynight #instagood #blonde #family #losangeles #photo #night #friends #me #smile #goodvibes #lifestyle #goodnight #workout #weekend
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - dawn, northern Kenya - a while ago now I was asked by a Samburu Moran (warrior) to hold the back of his young brother during his initiation. I had no idea at the time what this meant, or the significance of it to us both, but I did know it was an incredible honour. I met him this week and we talked briefly before he returned to his friends and football. I made him shoes out of cow hide and fitted them to his feet; he would wear only these for the month of his metamorphosis into a warrior. I struggled to sleep in my tent not quite knowing what to expect, listening to the songs of warriors and initiates from the surrounding villages. At 02.00 I left the tent and in darkness arrived at his hut which was already surrounded by elders singing songs of courage and support, songs that will help him be strong and carry him into manhood. I’d been told what to expect and what I was required to do, but now when for once I was part of the story, and not an observer, it felt oh so very different. I was to hold his back as the nurse circumcised him. He stood on a cow skin at the door of the home that he’d been brought up in. He was blessed and milk poured on to his shaven head causing him to sit abruptly on the skin. I sat behind him, my legs on either side of his body, I placed my left hand over is forehead and eyes and held his head very tightly to my chest. My right hand I held tightly across his chest, my hand on his heart. He couldn’t see the nurse now sitting in front of him, or the elders surrounding us, but he could hear them, and I could see and hear them both. As the nurse skilfully worked his heart exploded under my hand, and then calmed to a steady beat. We lifted him back into his home and quietly left. He had not made a sound, he was a warrior. I returned as the sun came up, and throughout the day to check on him. I hadn’t expected this, hadn’t expected to see, and more extraordinary feel the birth of a

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